Request Information


 
    1. Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

      Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Overview

      With the influence of new technologies, the face of crime is constantly changing. As a result, the need for criminal justice specialists continues to grow at a steady rate. Our Bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice online program can enable you to meet this need and propel your career in the broad field of criminal justice.

      The Criminal Justice education that our program offers is for law enforcement practitioners seeking to enhance their career potential, for those in other occupations looking to make a change, and for high school graduates preparing for a future in the criminal justice field. Our Criminal Justice classes are designed to offer comprehensive, relevant, practitioner-oriented preparation for this dynamic, rapidly growing profession.

      Graduates with Criminal Justice degrees will be prepared for entry-level positions or to apply their understanding of law enforcement, criminology, the judicial process, juvenile justice, corrections, and criminal law to their current job.

      Employment Opportunities

       

      According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), “Employment of police and detectives is expected to grow by 7 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. Continued demand for public safety will lead to new openings for officers in local departments; however, both state and federal jobs may be more competitive.

      The BLS also adds, “Bilingual applicants with a bachelor's degree and law enforcement or military experience, especially investigative experience, should have the best opportunities in federal agencies.”

      Source: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Protective-Service/Police-and-detectives.htm#tab-6

       

      Academic Requirements

      To be admitted to any of the programs at South University online programs, the prospective student must be a high school graduate from an acceptable high school or the equivalent (e.g. GED) with a minimum CGPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale, and be required to complete the University administered placement test during their first session of attendance, or meet the criteria established for acceptance as a transfer student. South University accepts the International Baccalaureate Program diploma as meeting the requirement for high school graduation.

      Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice - 180 Total Credits

      Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice are required to take a total of 180 credits as follows:

      • Area I: General Education Requirements - 64 credits
      • Area II: Foundation Requirements - 12 credits
      • Area III: Requirements - 104 credits

      To view the course descriptions

      Click on a course name below to display the description for that course. You can also display or contract all course descriptions by using the buttons below.

      Expand All Contract All

      Area I: General Education Requirements - 64 Credits



      Professional Development
      Students are required to take 8 credits as follows:

      ITS1000 - Computer and Internet Literacy

      This course is for students to obtain basic knowledge and skills in using computer office production software and internet features. A broad range of software applications, such as word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software, and internet usage concepts will be covered. Students will also use computer and communications technology to develop information literacy skills.

       

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4
      UVC1000 - Strategies for Success

      Designed to help entering students develop a more effective approach to college success, this course emphasizes positive self-evaluation, goal-setting, and motivation; practical skills of successful students; effective use of the library and the many sources of information available; and the concepts and tools of critical thinking, and their applications.

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4


      Basic Communications
      Students are required to take 16 credits as follows:

      ENG1100 - Composition I

      Students will be introduced to college-level writing processes, particularly planning, researching and writing essays. Emphasis will be placed on refining individual skills, writing styles and voices, types of essay and on effective writing procedures. Selected readings supplement the course and provide topics for discussion and writing assignments. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course.

      Prerequisite(s):
      ENG0099 or exemption thereof
      Credits: 4
      ENG1200 - Composition II

      Focusing on the construction of effective, researched written arguments, this course refines composition techniques, develops abstract thinking processes, and promotes critical thinking. By locating and evaluating sources and incorporating appropriately vetted academic sources into their work, students will create well-supported arguments within appropriately documented academic essays. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course.

      Prerequisite(s): ENG1100
      Credits: 4
      ENG1300 - Composition III/Literature

      In this course students write analytical and critical essays about fiction, drama, and poetry. Emphasis is placed on literal and figurative interpretations, structural analysis, and variations in thematic and critical reading approaches. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course.

      Prerequisite(s): ENG1100 ENG1200
      Credits: 4
      SPC1026 - Public Speaking

      This course is designed to prepare the student to develop and improve the ability to communicate. Self-expression, preparation of effective speeches, and development of speaking and listening skills will be emphasized.

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4


      Mathematics and Statistics
      Students are required to take 4 credits as follows:

      MAT2058 - Statistics

      Statistics introduces the student to the terminology and techniques of Statistics including  levels of measurement, measures of central tendency and variance, random variables, linear correlation and regression, normal probability distributions, sampling distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, and hypothesis testing.

      Prerequisite(s):
      MAT1005, or MAT1001 and MAT1500
      Credits: 4


      Students are required to take 8 credits from the courses listed below:

      MAT1001 - College Algebra I

      The course is designed to develop the concepts needed for College Algebra II using graphs and applications to motivate students and provide real-world examples. The course covers the solution of systems of linear equations, exponents and polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, functions, and quadratic equations. MyMathLab or a comparable resource may be used for lecture, homework and assessment assignment delivery.

      Prerequisite(s): MAT0099 or Exemption
      Credits: 4
      MAT1005 - College Algebra II

      College Algebra provides students with lecture and extensive practice in the concepts required as background for Pre-Calculus and Calculus.  The course emphasizes the graphs and properties of functions in general, with emphasis on linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

      Prerequisite(s): MAT1001
      Credits: 4
      MAT1500 - College Mathematics

      College Mathematics covers the fundamentals of several areas of mathematics, including set theory, logic, geometry, graph theory, probability, and statistics.

      Prerequisite(s): MAT0099
      Credits: 4


      Natural Sciences
      Students are required to take 8 credits from the courses listed below:


      BIO1020 - Biology I

      This is the first of a two-course sequence in biology.  This course introduces biology, scientific methods, biological chemistry, and energy for life.  This course also exposes students to the organization of humans and plants, basic genetics, and evolutionary concepts.  In addition, the student will complete writing assignments that serve to introduce scientific literature.

      Prerequisite(s): MAT0099
      Co- or Prerequisite: ENG1001
      Credits: 4
      BIO1021 - Biology II

      Biology II is the second in a two-course sequence in biology. This course continues the study of human biology with the roles of the endocrine and nervous systems in homeostatic regulation. Other topics covered are human reproduction, development, evolution, and advanced genetics. Ecological concepts are also discussed. The student will complete writing assignments that serve to increase knowledge of the scientific literature.

      Prerequisite(s):
      BIO1020 with a grade of C or better Co- or Prerequisite: ENG1001
      Credits: 4
      CHM1010_S - Chemistry

      CHM1010 is a survey course of general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental concepts and principles will be presented including atomic theory, bonding, nomenclature, solutions, acids and bases, and an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the application of these topics in various health fields. This overview provides the healthcare worker the ability to appreciate physiological and therapeutic processes at the molecular level. The course will also explore the role of chemistry in society today by applying a problem solving approach to understanding chemistry.

      Prerequisite(s):
      MAT0099 and math elective
      Credits: 4


      Arts and Humanities
      Students are required to take 8 credits from the courses listed below:

      ENG2002 - World Literature I

      Organized by period, genre and heme, this course explores global viewpoints as expressed in novels, poems, plays, short fiction, and philosophical and theological works from the period of the very first written texts up until the Middle Ages. Parallels and contrasts will be drawn between cultures and across time.

      Prerequisite(s): ENG1002
      Credits: 4
      ENG2003 - World Literature II

      Organized by period, genre and theme, this course explores global viewpoints expressed in novels, poems, plays, short fiction, and philosophical and theological works from the late 17th century through to the present day.  Parallels and contrasts will be drawn between cultures and across time.

      Prerequisite(s): ENG1002
      Credits: 4
      HUM1001 - Art History: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

      This course surveys the history of art beginning with the Prehistoric/Tribal period and continuing through the Middle Ages. The concepts, artists, motifs, works, and styles of the periods will be studied. The course introduces students to elements of art and design, and fosters an appreciation for the world of art.

      Prerequisite(s):
      Co- or Prerequisite: ENG1001
      Credits: 4
      HUM1002 - History of Art from the Middle Ages to Modern Times

      This course surveys the history of art from the Middle Ages to the present. The concepts, artists, motifs, works, and styles of the periods will be studied. The course introduces students to elements of art and design, and fosters an appreciation for the world of art.

      Prerequisite(s):
      Co- or Prerequisite: ENG1001
      Credits: 4
      PHI2301 - Introduction to Philosophy

      This course introduces students to critical philosophical thinking. Students will confront fundamental questions of self and identity, of freedom and determinism, of belief and truth, and of ethics and morality. Critical thinking activities will challenge students to incorporate philosophy into their daily lives by applying the questions of philosophy to themselves and their world.

      Prerequisite(s):
      Co- or prerequisite: ENG1002 or ENG2001
      Credits: 4


      Social and Behavioral Sciences
      Students are required to take 8 credits as follows:

      PSY1001 - General Psychology

      An introduction and overview of the major principles in the field of Psychology including: mental disorders, personality, social understanding, stress and coping, learning, memory, neuroscience, and consciousness. Students will also gain a broad understanding of how these areas are interconnected from a theoretical and practical worldview in addition to scientific modes of thought about behavior.

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4
      SOC1001 - Introduction to Sociology

      This course introduces the study of human social development, social organizations and social institutions. Students will apply sociological perspectives to examine topics such as the development of self-concept, group dynamics, culture, social deviance, gender equality, social class, racial and ethnic relations, demography and population, the family, religion, and education.

      Prerequisite(s):
      ENG1001 (recommended)
      Credits: 4


      Students are required to take 4 credits from the courses listed below:

      ECO2071 - Principles of Microeconomics

      Microeconomics is the study of how individuals, households and firms make decisions about consumption and production which affect the supply and demand of goods and services.  Other topics include the costs of production, behavior of firms, organization of industries, economics of labor markets, and theories of consumer choice.

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4
      ECO2072 - Principles of Macroeconomics

      The study of macroeconomics includes the basic aspects of economic analysis of the business world. Students will develop an understanding of the monetary system, recession, inflation, and the main cycles of business activity.

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4
      POL2076 - American Government

      This course introduces students to the American Government. By examining the struggle for power - the participants, the stakes, the processes, and the institutional arenas - this course introduces the students to the political strategies that drive democracy.

      Prerequisite(s):
      Co- or prerequisite: ENG1002 or ENG2001
      Credits: 4
      SOC2010 - Social Problems

      This course exposes the student to social problems in the United States and globally. The student will learn the structural causes of social problems, the role that race or ethnicity, gender, and class play in social inequalities and the position the United States holds with respect to global social problems. Topics may include economic problems, environmental issues, problems of social inequality, deviance, and institutional problems. The student will also learn how to develop solutions to social problems.

      Prerequisite(s): SOC1001
      Credits: 4


      Area II: Foundation Requirements - 12 Credits
      Students are required to take 12 credits as follows:

      PSY2007 - Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

      An investigation of the methodological principles regarding behavioral science research, descriptive and inferential techniques, and the process of using these techniques for psychological experimentation and data analysis.

      Prerequisite(s):
      PSY1001 with a C or better; MAT1001 and MAT1500 with a C or better
      Credits: 4
      PSY2008 - Statistics for Behavioral Sciences Lab

      An understanding of the statistical principles associated with the study of behavioral science research through application and computerized data analysis (i.e., SPSS).

      Prerequisite(s):
      Co-requisite: PSY2007
      Credits: 2
      PSY2060 - Research Methods

      Research design and methodology. An analysis of the approaches to developing, understanding, and interpreting psychological phenomena. Topics include experimental vs. non-experimental research such as survey, observation, case study, and archival data. An understanding of reliability, validity, and experimental control issues.

      Prerequisite(s):
      PSY2007 with a C or better
      Credits: 4
      PSY2061 - Research Methods Lab

      An understanding of the methodological principles associated with behavioral science research through an application of the theoretical, conceptual, and practical principles.

      Prerequisite(s):
      Co-requisite: PSY2060 PSY2008 with a C or better
      Credits: 2


      Area III: Major Requirements - 104 Credits



      Core
      Students are required to take 44 credits as follows:

      CRJ1001 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

      This course is intended to be an examination of the criminal justice system and will provide a core understanding of the history, processes and functions of the three primary components; law enforcement, corrections and the court system. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary problems in the definition of law, strategies of policing, judicial systems, enforcement of the law, correctional practices and sentencing. This course will familiarize students with the operation of the criminal justice system and law enforcement in the United States while developing an appreciation for the diverse values and viewpoints that make up that system.

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4
      CRJ2100 - Introduction to Law Enforcement

      This course is intended to be an overview of contemporary policing in the United States. The course explores the principles of policing, history of police, police administration and police operations. The overall goal of the course is to familiarize students with the field of law enforcement in the United States.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001
      Credits: 4
      CRJ2200 - Introduction to Criminal Courts

      This course provides a comprehensive look at the criminal court system in the United States. All levels are explored (local, state, federal, and international courts). Courtroom work groups as well as the roles of judges are examined. Relevant issues such as judicial selection, judicial decision making, and judicial review are covered. Trends in the court system will also be discussed.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001
      Credits: 4
      CRJ2300 - Introduction to Corrections

      This course provides a broad examination of the American correctional system. The course considers the purposes of punishment and examines correctional facilities as well as community-based corrections. The student will examine the challenges related to operating a facility, including respecting the rights of inmates while ensuring safety and security. The course concludes with a review of key contemporary issues, including the death penalty.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001
      Credits: 4
      CRJ2800 - Criminal Law and Procedures

      This course begins with an introduction to the nature of criminal law, including the definitions and elements of crimes and defenses available to those being prosecuted. The course then examines the procedures that take place after an arrest is made, including pre-trial activities, courtroom processes, jury procedures, and appeals.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3003 - Juvenile Delinquency

      This course examines the nature and extent of delinquency, as well as theories of delinquency and the various causes. In addition, an overview of the juvenile justice system will be presented. Specifically, issues and trends regarding juveniles and the police, the juvenile court system, and juvenile corrections will be examined. Current methods or treatment and prevention will also be discussed.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3004 - Race, Class, and Gender in Criminal Justice

      This course will focus on theoretical foundations and current research on theories of racial, ethnic, class, and gender discrimination within America's criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on the most recent research on patterns of criminal behavior and victimization, police practices, court processing and sentencing, the death penalty, and correctional programs as they relate to minority groups.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100 CRJ2200 CRJ2300
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3005 - Criminal Justice Management and Administration

      This course covers modern management theory and the application of management techniques to the criminal justice system. This course focuses on criminal justice managers and supervisors, their jobs, and the complicated interrelationships between members of criminal justice agencies and the communities they serve. Topics covered include: leadership, organizational behavior, and employee supervision.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100 CRJ2200 CRJ2300
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3011 - Criminology

      This course focuses on the causes of crime and theories of criminal behavior including biological, psychological and sociological theories. Students will also explore recent developments in criminological theory and current issues in criminology.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100 CRJ2200 CRJ2300
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3025 - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

      This course examines systems of law, police, courts, and corrections in different countries to show the various ways policing, adjudication, and corrections systems can be organized and operated.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100 CRJ2200 CRJ2300
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3500 - Ethics in Criminal Justice

      This course examines ethical issues faced by actors in the criminal justice system. The focus will be placed on the philosophical and practical approaches to solve ethical dilemmas within the complicated criminal justice system.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100 CRJ2200 CRJ2300
      Credits: 4


      Major Electives
      Students are required to take 32 credits from the courses listed below.

      Transfer students may transfer any course to help fulfill the elective pool requirements. Non-transfer students, with their advisor's consultation and approval may choose courses from any department recommended and listed course or more broadly from any course offered by South University. A course can be used to meet only one requirement in Area I, Area II, or Area III, but not simultaneously in two areas. Students should work with their academic advisor or counselor to be sure they are making appropriate course choices.

      CRJ3014 - Criminal Justice and the Media

      Criminal Justice and the Media will explore the relationship between the mass media, crime, and the criminal justice system in the United States. Students will examine the role the media plays in the social construction of crime and justice and the impact of the media on attitudes and perceptions of crime and criminality. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship of the media and crime prevention, and the impact of the media on the operations of the agencies in the criminal justice system from law enforcement to corrections.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ3011
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3023 - Organized Crime

      Historical and review and contemporary activities of national and international organized groups. Emphasis is placed on the nature and concept of organized crime, both traditional and nontraditional, as well as the rise of the modern criminal networks. Cultural and social implications of the presence of organized crime and emerging strategies used in the investigation, prosecution, and prevention of organized crime are examined in depth.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100 CRJ2200 CRJ2300
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3026 - Concepts in Crime Mapping and Prevention

      This course is intended to be an overview of the various facets of crime mapping and prevention theories including, criminal behavior and victimology. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the role of place and space in crime theory, in analyzing crime patterns, and how the environment can be altered to prevent crime and/or reduce the fear of crime.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001
      Credits: 4
      CRJ4002 - Restorative Justice

      This course defines restorative justice and its values, explores its foundational underpinnings, and details ways to build restorative justice into policy and practice. The course will expose students to how restorative justice fits into our criminal justice system and how it can be applied effectively.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100
      Credits: 4
      CRJ4009 - Illegal Immigration

      This course provides an in-depth overview of immigration policy in the United States with a focus on how immigration patterns, laws, and related policies have affected the criminal justice system. Current issues related to immigration and its effects on American society will be analyzed including ways immigrants find their way into the United States, find work, residency issues, and the roles of the criminal justice system in responding to the presence of documented and undocumented immigrants. Proposed changes to immigration law and policies, including criminal justice system responses, will also be examined.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001
      Credits: 4
      CRJ4011 - Terrorism and Homeland Security

      This course focuses on the theories of domestic and international terrorism and the criminal justice response to homeland security.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001
      Credits: 4
      CRJ4015 - Bloodstain Pattern Analysis

      This course explains the underlying scientific principles involved in bloodstain pattern analysis, which helps in the reconstruction of violent crime scenes. Topics include: the general properties of blood, droplet directionality, documenting bloodstains, and dealing with the risk of blood borne pathogens.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ3600
      Credits: 4
      CRJ4021 - Cyber Crime

      This course is designed to introduce the student to the investigation of computer crime and the forensic examination of digital evidence. This course involves intensive study of the history and terminology of computer crime, the types of crimes committed in cyberspace, a behavioral profile of computer offenders, legal issues in cyberspace, the proper collection and preservation of digital evidence and an overview of computer forensics.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100 ITS1101
      Credits: 4
      CRJ4650 - Forensic Issues

      This course will be an in-depth look at specific areas of forensic science. The course will focus on the collection, preservation, and examination of physical evidence, drug analysis, toxicology, biological evidence, firearms, documents, fingerprints, and digital evidence.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ3600
      Credits: 4


      Program Electives
      Students are required to take 24 credits from the courses listed below:

      CRJ3015 - White-Collar Crime

      This course examines the various types of "white-collar" and economic crimes in America. These include corporate crimes, such as consumer fraud and stock fraud, environmental crimes, corruption, medical crime, and computer-based crime. Students will learn about pyramid schemes, e-mail and Web-based crimes, boiler-room operations, and criminal organizations posing as religions or charities.

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3024 - Serial Killers and Mass Murderers

      Exploration into serial killers and mass murderers, and the impact each has on society and individual victims. Examines issues of causation and the social environmental linkage of recent and notorious cases and includes examination of the mind set of offenders.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100 CRJ2200 CRJ2300
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3300 - Community Based Corrections

      This course will introduce students to the procedures, practices, and personnel involved in community-based corrections. Students will learn about the wide array of effective punishments and treatment programs that constitute alternatives to incarceration, and which are designed to meet the level of risk posed by, and the needs of, each individual. These include probation, parole, electronic monitoring, house arrest, day-treatment centers, boot camps, restitution, fines, and more.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2300
      Credits: 4
      CRJ3600 - Introduction to Forensics

      This course will be an in-depth look at specific areas of forensic science. The course will focus on the Crime Scene; Physical Evidence; Organic and Inorganic Analysis; Paint Analysis; Fire and Explosion Investigation; Fingerprints; and Impressions.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001
      Credits: 4
      CRJ4001 - Victimology

      The course is a comprehensive look at the theories of victimology and the interaction of crime victims with others in the criminal justice system.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ3011
      Credits: 4
      CRJ4003 - Critical Issues in Criminal Justice

      This course examines contemporary issues involving the criminal justice system. Students will investigate all sides of current controversies and analyze their impact on the institutions that comprise the system.

      Prerequisite(s): CRJ1001 CRJ2100 CRJ2200 CRJ2300
      Credits: 4


      Capstone
      Students are required to take 4 credits as follows:

      CRJ4999 - Senior Seminar

      The Senior Capstone course is designed to provide students the opportunity to reflect upon their Criminal Justice education and demonstrate the specific competencies acquired from prior coursework. This course is designed to ensure graduates of the Criminal Justice program are equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue further study in the discipline or obtain responsible positions with criminal justice agencies or related professional organizations. The Capstone course emphasizes the connection between scholarship, policy and practice.

      Prerequisite(s):
      All required CRJ courses or co-completion
      Credits: 4


      Developmental Courses

      Placement tests in Algebra and English are administered to determine if a student needs additional preparation in either of these areas.  If a need is indicated, accepted applicants are placed in developmental courses on the basis of their entrance/placement test scores and/or transfer credit.  Students must successfully complete or place out of developmental courses in order to progress in the program.  Developmental course credits do not count towards the total number of credits for graduation however, they do count in determining the maximum time frame and incremental completion rate calculations.

      ENG0099 - Principles of Composition

      This course helps students refine their writing skills by focusing on the elements of style and grammar. Students compose paragraphs and essays in preparation for more advanced composition classes. A minimum grade of a C is required o pass this course. NOTE: This course is offered for institutional credit only.

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4
      MAT0099 - Principles of Algebra

      This course is designed to develop the basic concepts in algebra that are needed as background for intermediate algebra and college math. The approach emphasizes the relationship between arithmetic and algebra, using graphs and applications to motivate students and provide real-world examples. The course begins with signed numbers, proceeds to solving linear equations, and concludes with the Rectangular Coordinate System and graphs. A minimum grade of C is required to pass this course.

      Prerequisite(s): None
      Credits: 4


      Acceptance into a South University Criminal Justice program or its completion does not imply or guarantee that a student will be able to obtain employment in law enforcement, corrections, probation/parole or related fields. The student should contact the national, state or local agency/institution in which the student intends to gain employment for specific requirements and the application process.

      State approval policies require residents of the State of Arkansas to enroll in specific courses within this program rather than the courses specified in the program description above. Residents of the State of Arkansas should contact their admissions representatives for specific courses required within this program.

      Maryland residents are not eligible to enroll into an internship, externship, practicum, or field experience course. Students should work with their academic advisor or counselor to be sure they are making appropriate course choices.

      Ready to take the next step?

      Our admissions representatives talk to students in situations like yours every day, and will prepare you with all of the opportunities, challenges, and expectations that come with an education at South University, Online Programs.

      Information Request Form

      South University is committed to protecting any personal information that you may provide to us. Review our Privacy Policy to learn more.












      By clicking the button below as my official signature, I consent to representatives of South University, Online Programs contacting me about educational opportunities via phone, including my mobile phone if provided above, using an automatic dialer. I understand that my consent is not a requirement for any purchase.

      Related programs: