Twitter is More than Just a Fun Networking Service

by South University 12 July 2014

By Guest Blogger, Ruth E. Roberman, Online Program Director for Mathematics

Do you have a Twitter account? Perhaps you follow your favorite baseball team, weather reporter, or newspaper, or maybe you use Twitter for your daily dose of cute puppy pictures. There are plenty of terrific sites that give you a quick blast of information and even a smile. Plus, you can read a lot of short tweets without writing or retweeting anything. However, have you also considered the career benefits of having a Twitter account? You never know what tweet might give you the next big idea for a paper, business, proposal, or job!

Twitter convo

As a way to really expand your Twitter feed each day, check out who you follow and see who they follow. Here are some ideas. Who do you recommend following?

Business and IT

Business Law Section of the ABA (@ABABusLaw)
Wall Street Journal Business News (@WSJbusiness)
Shark Tank (@ABCSharkTank)
Entrepreneur Wiki (@EntWiki)
Harvard Business Review (@HarvardBiz)
Yahoo Finance (@YahooFinance)
Smashing Magazine (@smashingmag)

Health Sciences and Nursing

Mayo Clinic (@MayoClinic)
Dr. Mehmet Oz (@DrOz)
Nurse Jobs (@Nursing_nursemp)
Nurses Association (@ANANursingWorld)
Cleveland Clinic (@ClevelandClinic)
American Cancer Society (@AmericanCancer)
NursingBuddy (@NursingBuddy)
Society for Science (@Society4Science)
RN Action (@RNAction)
Mental Health NIMH (@NIMHgov)

Legal and Criminal Justice

Above the Law (@atlblog)
American Bar Association (@ABAesq)
Legal Aid Service (@LegalAidService)
The National Law Journal (@TheNLJ)

Job Searching

Interview Success (@InterviewSuccess)
Yahoo Jobs (@YahooCareers)
Consider following companies you may be interested in working for some day.

Miscellaneous

South University (@SouthU)
South University, Online Programs (@SuCampusCommon)
Astro Pic Of The Day (@apod)
Popular Mechanics (@PopMech)
Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson)
Cute Emergency (@CuteEmergency)
Quote Soup (@Quote_Soup)
Veterans Affairs (@DeptVetAffairs)
TED Talks (@TEDTalks)
Graphic Design Junction (@graphicdesignju)
My Modern Metropolis (@mymodernmet)

South University is not responsible for the content or accuracy of any social media site linked to this Web site. The links are provided for your information and convenience only. South University does not endorse, support or sponsor the content of any linked social media sites. If you access or use any third party sites linked to South University’s Web site, you do so at your own riskSouth University makes no representation or warranty that any other social media site is free from viruses, worms or other software that may have a destructive nature.

3 Ways Students Should Be Using Twitter

by South University 26 September 2013

When it comes to social media, it can be hard to keep up with the latest trends and know the ins and outs of every site. Take Twitter, for example. Maybe you’ve created an account and a user name (your Twitter handle), but you’re not sure what’s next. How can using Twitter benefit a professional adult like you? It might surprise you to learn that Twitter can be extremely helpful in networking, building your professional reputation, and even searching for the next step in your career.

Twitter convo

1. Connect with industry colleagues.

Find and follow established companies and professionals in your field and possibly in your city. Pay attention to what they’re tweeting and when you see something you like or agree with, retweet it. Even better, reply with your opinion included.

Based on someone’s tweets, you can also start a conversation about a shared interest. Ask their opinion on something or recommend articles or sites you think they’ll enjoy. Connecting with someone on Twitter can be an easy way to start a professional relationship!

2. Build your professional reputation.

Start by choosing a Twitter handle that sounds professional and writing a bio that speaks to who you are and where you are in your career. Your tweets should reinforce whatever this bio says. If you say you’re a working mom, dedicated nurse and lifelong learner, that’s what you should tweet about. (Follow us @SuCampusCommon to see what we’re tweeting about.) Find articles that talk about things like balancing your personal and professional life, the benefits of education, or new trends in nursing. Even better, give your own advice on this topic. Build credibility by showing that you’re aware of what’s going on around you and that you have something to contribute.

3. Search for Jobs.

Did you know that jobs are often posted on Twitter? Search using hashtags and keywords to find job postings in your area. Try searching #Jobs, #JobOpening, #ApplyNow, or search for a combination of those with your career field – something like #HealthcareJobs or #ITJobs. Searching “#HealthcareJobs” and “Atlanta,” for example would allow you to narrow your search even further.

In addition, if you’re interested in specific companies, many organizations have Twitter accounts dedicated to job openings. Follow these accounts to know right away whenever a job in your field opens up!

Read More

4 Proactive Ways Job Seekers Should Use Twitter
How to Tweet Your Way to a Dream Job
4 Ways To Use Twitter To Find A Job
How to Effectively Use Twitter as a Job Search Resource

Facebook and its Social Impact

by South University 12 January 2012

If you don't have a Facebook account, you're probably in the minority. In the past few years, thanks to social networks like Facebook, we’re able to cast a wider social net than ever before.

It used to be that once a person graduated from high school, they’d have to make an effort to keep track of fellow classmates via letters and phone calls. Now, we can connect with those old friends and quickly and easily share photos and news with them. Excited to announce your engagement or the birth of your first child? All you need to do is log in to Facebook to get the word out to your extended network of connections.

Of course, there are some that argue that while Facebook makes it easier to keep in touch, the connections are often superficial. In a recent New York Times article entitled “The Facebook Resisters,” several individuals who are not Facebook members are profiled. One remarked that they found that because of Facebook, they rarely called their friends to speak on the phone anymore. Another recounted an odd situation in which he was in an elevator with a friend of a friend, and, thanks to Facebook, he already knew everything about her, despite the fact that the two had never spoken to each other.

While the Facebook naysayers may be in the minority today, they certainly have some fair points. As we build our social connections, what purpose do they serve for us? Do we really feel connected to our “friends”? If someone sends you a friend request, what determines whether or not you’ll accept it?

In the case of the online student, Facebook can be an invaluable resource. It allows you to connect with fellow classmates from all over the country, share experiences, and provide each other with support. Social networking, whether via Facebook or some other medium, can provide a wonderful supplement to a student’s online learning experience.

While Facebook and other social networks are deeply ingrained in our everyday lives, most of us can remember a time when that wasn’t the case. How have our interactions with those we consider close to us evolved since those days? Provided that we are mindful of how we interact with one another online, we can find that our lives are actually enriched by the ease with which we are able to connect with each other today.