Leap Day 2012

by South University 29 February 2012

It hasn't shown its face since 2008, but now it's back again – Leap Day! You know that the day exists, but do you know why? The origins of the day go all the way back to ancient Rome. It actually takes the Earth 365.25 days to revolve around the sun, so in order to coordinate dates with astronomy and the passing seasons, Julius Caesar ordered that an extra day be added to the calendar every four years at the end of February.

So, there you have it, Leap Day.

It may seem like this extra day doesn’t really do anything special for you. Life continues to go on, and deadlines in your classes continue to stand. But with 2012 having 366 days instead of 365, there are, at the very least, opportunities to reflect. Maybe you can use this day to tackle projects that had otherwise fallen by the wayside. This is particularly useful if you have a specific To Do List for the month of February.

And what if you were born on this day? How do you celebrate it? Obviously, you’re still a year older as each year passes, even if your birthday is absent from the calendar. Maybe this is your chance to throw a huge birthday bash, or do something daring that you might not otherwise. However you choose to celebrate it—or not—we wish you a very happy Leap Day!

A Look at the Future of Business Administration

by South University 27 February 2012

Welcome to the fourth installment in our blog series taking a look at the future of some the occupational fields you’ll find here at South University Online Programs. Today, we’re going to be looking at some trends and career outlooks in Business.

Business

When you pursue a career in business, there are a wide range of areas that you could focus on. From accounting to marketing to finance and a number of other fields, people interested in business have a lot of options to choose from. At South University, for example, our Bachelor of Science in Business Administration offers 11 specializations:

  • Accounting
  • Construction Management
  • Management and Leadership
  • Marketing
  • Finance
  • General Business Administration
  • Human Resources Management
  • Management Information Systems
  • Supply Chain and Logistics Management
  • Hospitality Management
  • Real Estate

So, what is the area that’s right for you and what does the future hold? There are a lot of sources for this type of information, but a great resource is the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Let’s just take a look at some of these fields and where they’re expected to be heading:

Accounting
“Employment of accountants and auditors is expected to grow by 22 percent between 2008 and 2018, which is much faster than the average for all occupations. This occupation will have a very large number of new jobs arise, about 279,400 over the projections decade. An increase in the number of businesses, changing financial laws and corporate governance regulations, and increased accountability for protecting an organization's stakeholders will drive job growth.”

Construction Management
“Employment of construction managers is projected to increase by 17 percent during the 2008–18 decade, faster than average for all occupations. Construction managers will be needed as the level and variety of construction activity expands, but at a slower rate than in the past. Modest population and business growth will result in new and renovated construction of residential dwellings, office buildings, retail outlets, hospitals, schools, restaurants, and other structures that require construction managers.”

Human Resources Management
Employment is expected to grow much faster than the average for all human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists occupations. College graduates and those who have earned certification should have the best job opportunities.

Overall employment is projected to grow by 22 percent between 2008 and 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. Legislation and court rulings revising standards in various areas—occupational safety and health, equal employment opportunity, wages, healthcare, retirement plans, and family leave, among others—will increase demand for human resources, training, and labor relations experts.

What about the future of business careers themselves? According to the opinion of Lena Bottos, director of compensation at Salary.com as reported in msnbc.com:

“In business, professionals with international experience or knowledge — especially in finance or law — will be hot as the emphasis on global trade and business grows, Bottos said. Companies will navigate tax codes, laws, work regulations, environmental regulations and ethical questions worldwide.”

While some of these areas are covered above, you can see the diversity of opportunities available to individuals seeking to pursue a career in business. So, where can you look for even more information on business careers?

If you’d like to learn more about the business degrees offered at South University, please visit our main business page. You might also like Msnbc.com’s special report on the Future of Business, which covers a lot of interesting articles and features on what may lie ahead. Also, the Bureau of Labor Statistics covers the outlook for a wide range of business careers fat their site.

We hope this post has been helpful to you, stay tuned for part 5 of our blog post series as we look at the future of legal and paralegal careers.

A Look at the Future of Criminal Justice

by South University 23 February 2012

Welcome to the third installment in our blog series taking a look at the future of some the occupational fields you’ll find here at South University Online Programs. Today, we’re going to be looking at some trends and career outlooks in Criminal Justice.

Corrections

Criminal Justice is an area that covers a very broad range of fields – from Law Enforcement to Corrections to Homeland Security to Cyber Crime and beyond. So, what is the area that’s right for you? How are these specializations or even the broader field of Criminal Justice looking into the future?

One way to tell you how many variations there are within the field of Criminal Justice is that the Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn’t have just one page on a career outlook dedicated to this industry. They do cover 3 main areas:

Police and Detectives

"Employment of police and detectives is expected to grow 10 percent over the 2008–18 decade, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Population growth is the main source of demand for police services.

"Overall opportunities in local police departments will be favorable for individuals who meet the psychological, personal, and physical qualifications. In addition to openings from employment growth, many openings will be created by the need to replace workers who retire and those who leave local agencies for Federal jobs and private-sector security jobs."

Probations and Corrections

"Employment of probation officers and correctional treatment specialists is projected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2018. Job opportunities are expected to be excellent.

"In addition to openings due to growth, many openings will be created by replacement needs, especially openings due to the large number of these workers who are expected to retire. This occupation is not attractive to some potential entrants due to relatively low earnings, heavy workloads, and high stress. For these reasons, job opportunities are expected to be excellent"

Private Detectives and Investigators

"Employment of private detectives and investigators is expected to grow 22 percent over the 2008–18 decade, much faster than the average for all occupations. Increased demand for private detectives and investigators will result from heightened security concerns, increased litigation, and the need to protect confidential information and property of all kinds.

"Keen competition is expected for most jobs because private detective and investigator careers attract many qualified people, including relatively young retirees from law enforcement and military careers. The best opportunities for new jobseekers will be in entry-level jobs in detective agencies. Opportunities are expected to be favorable for qualified computer forensic investigators."

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg! For example, at South University, in our Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice degree program, we offer 5 specializations:

  • Corrections
  • Crime Scene Investigation
  • Cyber Crime
  • Law Enforcement
  • Juvenile Justice

While our Master of Science in Criminal Justice degree program offers specializations in:

  • Homeland Security
  • Corrections
  • Cyber Crime
  • Public Administration

While some of these areas are covered above, you can see the diversity of opportunities available to individuals seeking to pursue a career in Criminal Justice. So, where can you look for even more information on this field? Doing some research on your own to find a field that interests you would be a good first step.

You can also check out this useful resource guide compiled by the National Criminal Justice Association, with links to many federal and local agencies where you can learn more about what different Criminal Justice organizations do.

We hope this post has been helpful to you, stay tuned for part 3 of our blog post series as we look at the future of Business careers.

A Look at the Future of Nursing and Healthcare

by South University 21 February 2012

Welcome to the second installment in our blog series taking a look at the future of some the occupational fields you’ll find here at South University Online Programs. Today, we’re going to be looking at some trends and career outlooks in Nursing.

Nursing

Healthcare related fields, including nursing, are undergoing a lot of changes as new laws and regulations take effect and the population ages. These changes are creating a need for nurses as the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that nearly 600,000 new jobs for registered nurses will be created by 2018.

The BLS projects that:

“Overall job opportunities for registered nurses are expected to be excellent, but may vary by employment and geographic setting. Some employers report difficulty in attracting and retaining an adequate number of RNs. Employment of RNs is expected to grow much faster than the average and, because the occupation is very large, 581,500 new jobs will result, among the largest number of new jobs for any occupation. Additionally, hundreds of thousands of job openings will result from the need to replace experienced nurses who leave the occupation.”

As far as the healthcare industry in general, according to an article in Monster.com, a popular job search site:

“Indeed, healthcare is still a rare bright spot in a job market that can't get out of first gear. Jobs in healthcare rose to 14.19 million in October 2011 from 13.88 million a year earlier, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Hospital jobs increased by 84,000 over the period, but ambulatory services -- physician offices, outpatient clinics and home health agencies -- stole the show, adding more than 173,000 positions.”

As we mentioned earlier, changes to the healthcare industry, such as health care reform will also have a major impact on career prospects for nurses. According to the publication Nursezone.com:

“Health care reform may also have the effect of opening up more jobs in nursing in the future. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act, voted into law in 2010, is expected to result in the need for many more nurses to care for the expected 30-plus million people who will be added to the insurance rolls.

Additionally, many are calling for advanced practice nurses to provide primary care and fill the gaps left by a shortage of primary care physicians.”

In short, nursing and the field of healthcare are continuing to grow. There are a lot of great resources out there for you to explore, including the Bureau of Labor Statistics nursing page, the American Nursing Association and Nursezone.com, among others.

Stay tuned for part 3 of our series looking at the future of our areas of study with a look at the field of Criminal Justice.

A Look at the Future of Information Technology

by South University 13 February 2012

Welcome to the first installment in our blog series taking a look at the future of some the occupational fields you’ll find here at South University Online Programs. Today, we’re going to be looking at some trends and career outlooks in Information Technology.

South University Online Programs offers three Information Technology Degree Programs, Associate of Science in Information Technology, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology and the Master of Science in Information Systems and Technology.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Excellent job prospects are expected” in the Information Technology field in the coming years:

"Overall employment of computer network, systems, and database administrators is projected to increase by 30 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. In addition, this occupation will add 286,600 new jobs over that period. Growth, however, will vary by specialty.

"Employment of network and computer systems administrators is expected to increase by 23 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations."

As technology continues to evolve with each passing day, the nature of the Information Technology industry continues to change as well, with new types of career paths constantly emerging. According to InfoWorld Magazine, these IT jobs will be amongst the most sought after in the coming years:

  • Business architect
  • Data scientist
  • Social media architect
  • Mobile technology expert
  • Enterprise mobile developer
  • Cloud architect

Is Information technology something you might be interested in? If so, check out our programs at South University Online Programs.

Stay tuned for part 2 of our series looking at the future of our areas of study with a look at the fields of Nursing and Healthcare.